…and something continues.

While that was being taken care of, a CT scan, MRI and ultrasound found that there was a small narrowing in my portal vein, one of the two main vessels in the liver. It wasn’t impeding blood flow, or causing a problem with the liver function, but my surgeon felt it would be good to place a stent in it to ward off any future complications. They didn’t know if it was something that happened as a result of the surgery, or something that was an anatomical abnormality. In either case, a week after my discharge, I headed back to Rochester to have the stent put in.

I was told that I would be there for 24 hours, which turned into 72 hours. There were some small blood clots around the stent (actually two stents), and they started me on a regimen of Coumadin, a “blood thinner.” So, now I’m home, and dealing with the side effects of this medication, of which tiredness is one of them. It reminds me too much of the fatigue I experienced from my liver disease, though I’m told that it will pass. I hope so, as it’s a little unnerving, to say the least.

Advertisements

It’s always something…

The first year post transplant. One big “shit happens” moment, and it did last week. Somehow, somewhere, I picked up both a bacterial and viral infection that landed me in the hospital for close to a week. A few weeks beforehand, my liver enzymes began creeping up, and as it happened, corresponded to when they reduced my immunosuppresion medications. It’s normal to do this, but it’s not an exact science. I thought for sure I was headed for rejection, which actually happened before, during my first transplant back in 2002 (I was transplanted in 1997).

I felt fine at first, no symptoms whatsoever. then about ten days ago, out of nowhere started the chills, but initially no fever. I called my transplant coordinate and it was decided that I should make the trip down the Thruway to Strong as a precaution. Fortunately, I was directly admitted as opposed to spending an interminable amount of time in the ED. By the time I got in there, my fever was registering at 102F, and I was feeling pretty lousy. Twenty-four hours later, all that changed.

I was connected to an IV and given IV antibiotics, one in particular, Daptomycin, is a new class of them, and is akin to an atomic bomb to bacteria. It has no known resistance (yet), and works quickly and efficiently…

 

To be continued…